National concealed reciprocity bill picks up 200th supporter in House

National concealed reciprocity bill picks up 200th supporter in House

Legislation to treat concealed carry permits like drivers’ licenses nationwide is gaining steam in Congress while opponents dig in.

Introduced by U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson, R-NC, on the first day of session in the new House, the bill now enjoys the support of Hudson and 199 co-sponsors from 42 states. The bill is largely Republican, with three Democrats crossing the aisle, and is currently one of the top 10 most-viewed bills in Congress.

“Your driver’s license works in every state, so why doesn’t your concealed carry permit?” says a backgrounder on the bill circulated by Hudson’s office. “Just like your privilege to drive, your Second Amendment right does not disappear when you cross state lines. However, conflicting state codes have created a confusing patchwork of reciprocity agreements for concealed carry permit holders.”

Hudson’s bill would amend federal law to allow those eligible to possess a firearm to have a concealed handgun in any state that allows individuals to carry a pistol or revolver. Those who do so would have to carry a valid permit with them as well as a photo ID. The bill also applies to nonresident permit holders.

A companion measure, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn’s S.446, has 37 co-sponsors, all Republican.

While Second Amendment groups large and small support the legislation, gun control advocates have drawn a line in the sand to stop the bill, with former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Everytown organization pledging as much as $25 million to derail the campaign.

Astronaut and Navy Capt. Mark Kelly, co-founder with his wife– former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords — of Americans for Responsible Solutions, has often argued that national reciprocity violates states’ rights and constitutes a public safety threat, going on to describe it simply as “bad legislation” when speaking recently in the aftermath of an attack on House Republicans at a charity baseball practice.

The measure has been referred to the House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, but is not scheduled for a hearing.

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GOP Goes Quiet on Gun Silencers—for Now, at Least—After Congressional Shooting

By agreement among Republicans after Wednesday’s frightful shooting that left Majority Whip Steve Scalise in critical condition, yesterday was not the day to talk of gun control.

Not to worry, Republicans and National Rifle Association brass. Gun control advocates will wait a respectful moment before pointing out the absurdity of our gun laws so lax that even Justice Antonin Scalia said there should be restrictions. Or maybe they will wait much longer. Many have lost heart for the fight. If nothing got passed after small children at Sandy Hook, moviegoers, office workers, and partiers dancing the night away in Orlando were massacred—why would we think anything will happen now?

In fact, the talk that was permitted after the practice field shooting spree was largely about locking and loading and carrying. Three Harvard Business professors found that after a mass shooting, gun laws are more likely to be loosened than tightened. How’s that for counterintuitive behavior?

How about something NOT happening for a glimmer of hope? Yesterday a bill (the Hearing Protection Act!) that would allow silencers—those things that criminals use in the movies, and which are presently regulated more like machine guns than revolvers—was set for a hearing before the House Natural Resources Committee. It was canceled even before the leadership shut the entire House down for the day.

A wise move. Even if Republicans use their inside voices and talk nice, going on about the woes of hunters without silencers when it was the very sound of gunfire that allowed others at that field to run for cover, and for the Capitol Police to move to where the shots were coming from, would be particularly hard to take. Yes, perhaps we can be made to worry over the health of your ears and that of your hunting dogs. Just not today.

The bill to deregulate silencers has been bundled into a sportsmen’s package that might make it go down easier. It amends the National Firearms Act of 1934 to replace what the bill’s co-sponsor Rep. Jeff Duncan says is the outdated federal transfer process and its $200 fee with an instantaneous National Instant Criminal Background Check.

Duncan is so anxious to have people realize how useful silencers are (he prefers the Orwellian “suppressors”) that he hosted a demonstration earlier this month at a shooting range run by the Capitol Police in the Rayburn House Office Building. So many came, his press secretary Allen Klump said, they ran out of ammunition. As to what’s wrong with earplugs, Klump says, you have to be able to hear the wildlife before you see the wildlife in order to shoot the wildlife.

Proponents point out that a gun with a silencer is hardly silent. It reduces the sound by about 30 decibels to about the noise of a jackhammer. Maybe so, but who runs in the other direction at the sound of a jackhammer and what policeman runs towards it to suppress a shooter? To paraphrase the NRA, jackhammers don’t kill people.

The hearing hasn’t been rescheduled but the bill will get its day and likely pass this year with the support of Donald Trump and family. The president’s already signed a few gun bills and revoked a regulation that had prevented Social Security recipients with mental-health conditions from buying guns. His sons are hunters who’ve been photographed posing with everything but Cecil the Lion: a dead leopard, a crocodile, and a bloody elephant tail (they were culling the overpopulated herd) at a safari a few years ago.

Donald Jr. filmed a promotional spot for the Utah company Silenceco, named before suppressor replaced silencer as the term of art, in which he demonstrates the product and then says that for him the Second Amendment isn’t simply a “passion, it’s a lifestyle.”

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House votes 65-54 for bill easing concealed handgun laws

It would no longer be necessary to have a concealed handgun permit to bring a gun anywhere that firearms can already be carried openly, under a bill a divided state House tentatively approved on Wednesday.

The change would eliminate the need for concealed-carry permits for adults who are at least 18 and are not otherwise prohibited from owning firearms, except where open-carry is barred. That would change current law that requires concealed-carry applicants be at least 21 and complete firearm safety training to obtain a permit.

The debate on House Bill 746 was preceded by days of intense pressure from national and statewide gun-control and gun-rights advocates. It resulted in an 11-vote margin; eight Republicans broke from the majority and voted with all Democrats against the bill. The vote was 65-54.

Rep. Susan Fisher, a Democrat from Asheville, set the tone for the afternoon when she delivered the daily prayer peppered with references to the victims of gun violence.

Republican leaders used procedural maneuvers to bat down a series of amendments offered by Democrats, and eventually shut down the debate with six amendments pending. A final vote in the House is expected on Thursday, which would send the bill to the Senate.

“It will expand opportunities for law-abiding citizens to better protect themselves and their loved ones from harm,” Rep. Chris Millis, a Republican from Hampstead who is the main sponsor of the bill.

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Army to Gunmakers: Show Us a New 7.62mm Service Rifle

U.S. Army weapons officials have launched a survey to see what gunmakers can offer for an off-the-shelf 7.62mm Interim Combat Service Rifle.

The May 31 request for information, known in acquisition parlance as an RFI, on behalf of Product Manager Individual Weapons, is an attempt to “identify sources for a combat rifle system” and determine the potential cost and lead time to deliver up to 10,000 weapon systems, according to the document.

The request comes in the wake of Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley told lawmakers Congress last week that the M4 Carbine‘s current 5.56mm round can’t penetrate modern enemy body armor plates and that he’s considering arming infantry units with rifles chambered for a more potent 7.62mm cartridge.

“The rifle must be a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) system readily available for purchase today. Modified or customized systems are not being considered,” according to the document, which specifies that the caliber must be 7.62x51mm.

Milley told Senate Armed Services Committee members May 25 that Army officials at the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning in Georgia, have developed a new 7.62mm round capable of penetrating enemy body armor plates similar to U.S. military-issue rifle plates such as the Enhanced Small Arms Protective Insert, or ESAPI.

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Concealed Carry Holder Stopped ‘Bad Guy’ with Gun, Say Texas Police

Arlington, Texas, Police Department officials (APD) confirmed to Breitbart Texas that the now deceased shooter in Wednesday night’s attack on a sports bar/restaurant was prevented from doing “significant harm causing significant loss of life” by a man with a license to carry a concealed handgun. The gunman entered the restaurant with two “fully loaded handguns” and two knives, according to police.

The gunman, 48-year-old James Jones, entered the Zona Caliente Sports Bar in Arlington Thursday evening and began shouting what witnesses described as “strange and incoherent things,” APD Spokesman Lt. Christopher Cook told Breitbart Texas in a phone interview Thursday. Upon hearing the commotion, restaurant manager Cesar Perez, 37, approached Jones to attempt to calm him down. Cook said at that point, restaurant video revealed that Jones pulled one of his guns and shot Perez, killing him.

Hearing the argument escalating at the other end of the bar, a man having dinner with his wife became concerned that the situation was growing dangerous. He instructed his wife to get on the ground before the shooting began, Cook explained.

When Jones opened fire on Perez, the customer pulled his own handgun from concealment and “engaged the bad guy,” APD said.

“When the suspect was struck the first time,” Lt. Cook explained, “the video shows he appears unaware of where the gunfire is coming from. He turns towards the door, perhaps thinking police have entered, and begins firing multiple shots in that direction.” He said the concealed handgun license holder continued firing until the suspect was no longer a threat.

“The suspect died at the scene,” Cook told Breitbart Texas.

Cook verified the civilian was properly licensed to carry the handgun and the restaurant is one that it is legal for a License to Carry holder to enter (a “blue sign” establishment). He said the shooting will be referred to the Tarrant County grand jury, per normal procedure, but he expects the intervenor will not face any charges.

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Fightin’ Iron: The ASP 9 mm Pistol

Supposedly, the despondent Empress of Egypt, one Cleopatra by name, clutched an asp to her bosom and thereby ended her life. If this is true, it’s the waste of a perfectly good bosom, as the asp is a small, but lethally venomous snake. But since this all happened centuries past, we really don’t know all of the real history of the incident. Such is also the case with a modern semi-automatic pistol, the ASP 9 mm pistol, which may or may not have been clutched to somebody’s bosom at some point in the gun’s unusual history.

Surrounded by mystery, the ASP pistol is a late-20th century, concealed-carry 9 mm pistol, custom-built in New York City in the late 1960s and ’70s. While the aforementioned conundrum may never be unraveled, there are numerous examples of the enigmatic ASP pistol in the hands of students of handgun history and guys who need a slick little carry gun. I once had an example of an ASP for Shooting Review and found it to be a very interesting little sidearm. We need to start with an understanding of where the gun fits in the history of firearms.

It came along at a time when civilian, police and military personnel began looking for an improved version of a powerful semi-auto for concealed carry. This was the ’60s—a time when anyone who went armed used a Smith & Wesson J-frame or a Colt D-frame .38 Spl. revolver. There was nothing much available in a powerful-caliber semi-auto that was as easy to live with as a snubby revolver. Also, while custom pistolsmiths did exist, they were largely focused on highly modified target pistols and wheelguns. With this open field before him, a young holster maker out of New York City began a series of experiments to produce a 9 mm pistol optimized for habitual concealed carry. His name was Paris Theodore (working under the Seventrees brand) and his starting point was the milestone Smith & Wesson’s Model 39 semi-auto. This post-World War II gun entered the market in the late 1950s and was instantly popular. At this point in time, there were no U.S.-made service pistols with DA/SA trigger systems available in any caliber, much less guns in this class that were small enough as to be easily concealed.

Theodore is said to have tried many different modifications of the aluminum-frame 9 mm ASP pistol before he was satisfied with the result. The finished product was barely recognizable as a Smith & Wesson. The barrel and slide had been shortened at the muzzle end by almost an inch, while the frame had close to the same amount of reduction. When the frame was cut down, it required shortening of magazines to be used with the gun. This was done, but Theodore wisely added a new wedge-shaped floorplate to the magazine that gave the shooter a positive contact surface for their little finger. Most corners and edges received a radical melting treatment to lessen the likelihood of snagging on clothing. Other touches were a super trigger job and grips made of clear Lexan plastic, which were frosted except for a bar of clear material running down the side of the grip. This allowed the shooter to look through the grip at a window in the cutaway magazine—and see how many rounds he had left.

Original ASP pistols were made to order for right- or left-handed shooters. With trigger guard relief on the dominant side, as well as a hook on the front face of the trigger guard for the support-hand index finger, the little gun was very shootable.  Atop the slide, the original sights were removed and replaced with one of the more unusual efforts ever made to improve fixed-sight aiming—the “Guttersnipe Advanced Sighting Plane.” This unconventional system consisted of a channel slightly less than 2 inches, which tapered downward (both in width and height) from rear to front toward the muzzle. Portions of the guttersnipe’s interior were painted bright yellow, which gave the shooter a squarish yellow “U” that stood out from the metal of the rest of the pistol.  The idea was to put the target in the trough and squeeze ‘em off.

When correctly centered, the target is seen to be surrounded on three sides by the yellow frame and appears as three equally balanced triangles. If you are not aligned properly, one side or the other will appear larger and the bottom of the trough will appear thicker or thinner than the sides. There is no front sight to align, just put the target in the “U” and keep all three sides equal. I spent a fair amount of time shooting an ASP pistol one afternoon way back when and came away impressed with the system. It requires the shooter to be utterly consistent with grip, stance and trigger control and, above all else, to trust his instincts. I doubt if you would ever see a Guttersnipe system on the line at Camp Perry, but it absolutely does work for a close-quarters hideout gun.

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Silencer debate the latest gun battle

WASHINGTON — What the average person knows about silencers likely comes from James Bond and the “Bourne’’ movies —stealthy assassins holding up cylinder-tipped pistols and shooting their victims with nary a sound.

The National Firearms Act of 1934 subjected silencers to heavy and (at the time) unaffordable regulation, in an effort to deprive Al Capone-era gangsters of a favored murder accessory.

But as part of a legislative strategy switch from defense to offense, groups such as the Newtown-based National Shooting Sports Foundation are including a rollback of silencer regulations on its wish list in the era of gun-friendly GOP control of Congress and the White House.

Also included is the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, which would enable anyone legally carrying firearms in gun-rights states such as Texas and Florida to get protection of those loose laws even when during travel to gun-unfriendly jurisdictions such as Connecticut.

The concealed-carry reciprocity measure is a perennial that never got through Congress in previous years, and surely would’ve earned a Barack Obama veto if it had.

All states, including Connecticut, permit concealed carry in some form, although Connecticut makes it much more difficult to obtain a permit than, say, the Southern states.

“These proposals will put all our communities at risk,’’ said Rep. Elizabeth Esty, D-Conn., a leading gun-violence-prevention advocate among Democrats in the House.

Hearing Protection Act

Concealed-carrying Air Force reservist sees knife attack

His name Is Brandon Teel. He’s an active duty Air Force Reservist and he was driving hom the other night when he saw what he thought was two kids messing around. When he got closer he saw it was grown men and one was repeatedly stabbing the other.

What happened next has local cops calling him a hero.

“I quickly pulled out my concealed weapon, drew it on him and I said, ‘Stop what your doing, get down on the ground or I’m going to shoot you,’” Teel recalled to KATV-TV.

Austin police found Darren Terry, 47, with three wounds, and he was taken to a hospital. His brother Chris Terry, 30, was arrested and charged with first-degree domestic battery and was being held in jail on a $10,000 bond.

“Lt. Teel is a perfect example of a responsible concealed carry permit holder,” said Chief Bill Duerson. “He acted heroically in the face of extreme danger and avoided a tragedy.”

Source

Gun Test: Big Horn Armory Model 89 Carbine

The lever-action rifle stands tall within America’s gun culture. Much of this esteem stems from the days of westward expansion, when the lever-action repeater was the gun of choice. Even long after the frontiers were conquered, the appeal of the slim, tube-magazine repeaters from Marlin and Winchester remained strong. Of all the various models of that late-19th-century era, none are better remembered than the Winchesters, whose origins can be traced back to the fertile imagination of John Browning. While the later Models 94 and 95 were highly regarded for their marriage of smokeless powder and traditional operation, the earlier Winchester lever guns were appreciated for their smooth operation. Browning’s first Winchester repeater was the 1886, built for the longer blackpowder cartridges of the day, and six years later he scaled and shortened the Model 86 to produce the Model 92 for short blackpowder cartridges. Both guns were successful in their day and have been replicated in modern times.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2017/04/05/gun-test-big-horn-armory-model-89-carbine/#ixzz4dQ9lyrQ3

Oklahoma home invasion shooting: No charges against man who killed 3 intruders

An Oklahoma prosecutor said Monday no charges will be filed against a 23-year-old man who fatally shot three teenage intruders in his home, but that the woman who drove them there is being charged with first-degree murder.

Authorities say Zachary Peters was home alone when he shot Maxwell Cook, Jacob Redfern and Jakob Woodruff with an AR-15 rifle on March 27 at his home just outside the Tulsa suburb of Broken Arrow.

“It is the opinion of this office that Zachary Peters acted justifiably … when he used deadly force to defend his home,” said Wagoner County Assistant District Attorney Jack Thorp. “It was clear he operated completely within the law when he used deadly force,” Thorp later told The Associated Press.

The spellings of the names and the ages of the teens differ in some public records, but Wagoner County Deputy Nick Mahoney said the latest information is that Cook and Redfern were 18 and Woodruff was 15.

Wagoner County Sheriff Chris Elliott said he supports the decision not to charge Peters.

“We support the right of our citizens, the right to bear arms and to defend their homes,” Elliott said. “In this such case, we feel strongly that’s what took place here.”

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NC House approves concealed handgun option for church services on campus

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) — The state House approved a bill Monday night that would allow people to carry a concealed weapon at certain churches, citing concerns among some church leaders about security.

The lawmaker backing the bill says leaders of a church near her came to her about the issue and were concerned about safety.

But, some pastors say this goes too far and goes against what they preach at church.

It’s typically a tranquil scene at United Church of Chapel Hill, letting people know they are welcome.

But, one thing Reverend Richard Edens says is not welcome: guns.

“Having guns in a Sunday School. What value is that?” Edens said.

The State House voted Monday night 82-34 in support of a bill that could lead to more people carrying a concealed weapon at churches.

Republican Representative Rena Turner says a local church’s leaders approached her after the shooting at Emanuel AME in Charleston.

They said their security team would like to be able to carry a handgun.

“And, after that shooting in Charleston, they were just very concerned about their safety and feeling vulnerable,” Turner said.

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79-year-old Jeffco homeowner shoots, kills home invader with gun he kept by his bed

A suspected burglar was killed early this morning when a 79-year-old man shot him during a home invasion in eastern Jefferson County.

One of the burglars returned fire and struck the homeowner in the ankle, but he is expected to be OK. Authorities have not identified the dead man.

The ordeal began about 1:15 a.m. at a home on Ormond Drive in Center Point.

Jefferson County sheriff’s Chief Deputy Randy Christian said deputies responded to a report of a burglary in progress at the home. They arrived to find the elderly  homeowner sitting on the front porch of the home.

He was suffering from a gunshot wound to his leg. Inside the home deputies found the adult male suspect suffering from a gunshot wound. He was pronounced dead on the scene.

The homeowner had been asleep when he was awakened by a noise from his basement, Christian said. Two suspects had forced open a basement window and entered the house.

The suspects continued upstairs and confronted the victim who was still in his bed. One of the suspects ordered him not to move. The victim then grabbed a gun that he kept by his bed and began firing at the suspects.

One suspect fell and the other fled. The victim chased the fleeing suspect out of the house. As the suspect ran across the yard he fired a shot that struck the victim in the leg. He then got into a waiting vehicle driven by a third suspect and fled the scene.

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Product Focus: Ruger’s New MKIV .22LR

Product Focus: Ruger's New MKIV .22LR

Field stripping the MK IV takes mere seconds, thanks to the rear take down button.

The elegant lines, modest price, and tack driving accuracy made it an instant hit with shooters and it became the most popular plinking and target rimfire pistol in the country. It stayed in production until 1981. In 1982, the Ruger MK II replaced it; offering the modest price and similar features but in a more diverse line of models to better suit the needs of competitive shooters. In 2005, it was replaced by the MK III series. The changes in the MK III were the addition of a magazine safety; moving the magazine release from the heel of the butt to the preferred American-style ‘behind the trigger guard’ position; and the top of the receiver was now drilled and tapped to allow the easy mounting of the increasingly-popular optical sights.

None of these model changes altered the accuracy and handling of the original Standard Pistol. They merely provided more options for shooters. Unfortunately, they also failed to address the biggest drawback to the original design—field stripping for cleaning.

To be ‘extremely charitable’, field stripping the MK I, II, and III series guns was not quite as simple as many would have liked. A shooting buddy of mine summed it up well when he said “You need a degree in mechanical engineering, and it doesn’t hurt to have a Voodoo Priest standing by to assist.”

I certainly concur. My experience with the MK I, and my current MK II, goes back over 30 years and I never truly mastered the take down. In fact, the last time my MK II was field stripped was a decade ago. That resulted in my arriving at my local gunsmith with the proverbial ‘paper bag full of parts’, a sheepish grin, and my wallet in hand.

That won’t happen with the new MK IV.

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Some states could take big financial hit if gun industry slows under Trump

Donald Trump’s election to the White House has inadvertently slowed gun sales as many Second Amendment supporters no longer fear strict gun control. But as a result, the nation’s economy – both public and private sectors – might have to bite the bullet, and some states could take a bigger hit than others.

In its latest impact report, The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), the leading trade association for the firearms industry, estimates that the gun arena has created around 30,000 jobs over the past three years. And in 2016 alone, it is reported to have contributed more than $51 billion to the country’s economy and a further $7.4 billion in federal and state taxes.

“The economic growth America’s firearms and ammunition industry has experienced over the years has been nothing short of remarkable,” the NSSF stated. “Over the past couple of years, the industry’s growth has been driven by an unprecedented number of Americans choosing to exercise their fundamental right to keep and bear arms and purchase a firearm and ammunition.”

The NSSF insists that broader economic impact flows throughout the economy, “generating business for firms seemingly unrelated to firearms,” such as in banking, retail, accounting, metal working, even in printing, all depend on the firearms and ammunition industry for their livelihood.

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XD-S® 4.0 SINGLE STACK 9MM

When you need a concealed carry pistol that offers excellent capacity and the ultimate in shootability, check out the XD-S® 4.0″ Single Stack  in 9mm. You’ll find yourself astonished at how easy it is to shoot this small pistol. You’ll be even more impressed with how well it carries.

The XD-S® 4.0″ turns Springfield Armory®’s single stack XD-S® platform into a mid-sized pistol. The sub-compact frame extends to full-size length when you insert an X-Tension™ magazine, adding capacity and controllability for your time at the range. Use a flush fitting magazine for concealed carry, and you’ll forget it’s there.

Choosing a multi-purpose handgun doesn’t have to be a series of compromises anymore. The XD-S® 4.0″ Single Stack 9mm is a pistol that does not compromise in any department. Whether you are looking for capacity, concealability or shootability, you’ll find it in the XD-S® 4.0″ Single Stack 9mm. Put an XD-S® 4.0″ Single Stack in your hand today, and you’ll want to shoot it. Put it in your holster, and you’ll find that it’s Noticeably Unnoticeable™.

 

Bill would allow concealed carry guns on UNC, community college campuses

Legislation filed Thursday would allow concealed-carry permit holders to carry their handguns on UNC system and North Carolina community college campuses.

Rep. Kyle Hall, a Republican from King just north of Winston-Salem, said House Bill 251 would make campuses safer by allowing trained firearms holders to carry their weapons. But the legislation is likely to draw complaints from gun control groups and from higher education officials.

“This is just another safeguard to make sure our campuses are safe,” said Hall, a 2012 UNC-Chapel Hill graduate and one of four bill sponsors. “Our students and faculty should feel safe when they go on campus.”

Sig Sauer P320 (M17) vs Beretta M9

With the complexity of the topic, it’s difficult for the average reader to fully grasp why the Sig Sauer P320 was selected. In order to simplify this for our customers, our team at TacticalGear.com created an infographic comparing the P320 to the Beretta M9 at a glance.

To get acquainted with the new pistol and understand why the Army made the change, it’s vital to compare the performance and construction of the P320 and M9. The modularity of the P320 is a key benefit, but it’s not the only difference between these two handguns. This infographic strips these pistols down to their basic functionalities to compare them side-by-side.

http://tacticalgear.com/sig-sauer-p320-vs-beretta-m9

Thank you to our friends at Tatical Gear for sharing this information with our readers.

Repeal NFA petition ends with 250K signatures, Hughes falls short

A “We the people” petition for the federal government to repeal the National Firearms Act closed Sunday with a quarter million signatures, while one to scrap the machine gun ban narrowly failed.

Both petitions to the White House for gun reform started on President Donald Trump’s inauguration day and ended on Feb. 19.

The more popular of the two, “Repeal the NFA” seeking to do away with the National Firearms Act of 1934, garnered 254,314 signatures. There were over 4.4 million NFA items of all types listed on the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record (NFRTR) as of Feb. 2016 including destructive devices, machine guns, suppressors, and short barreled rifles and shotguns.

The second, to “Repeal the 1986 Hughes amendment,” the law which bans new production of machine guns for civilians, picked up 97,837 signatures.

Each petition needed 100,000 signatures to earn a response from the White House and had to reach that goal by midnight Sunday.

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The Guns Of U.S. Presidents

It wasn’t that long ago when firearms were not only welcome in the executive mansion, but at least eight of our Chief Executives* were proud of their NRA Life member status. One Commander in Chief, Ulysses S. Grant, even following his tenure in the White House.

With Presidents Day upon us, let’s take a look at some of the fascinating firearms owned and used by a few of the former presidents of the United States.

George Washington

The Father of Our Country was not only an avid hunter but also quite the gun aficionado. Numerous sets of pistols with provenance to the General are currently on exhibit at his Mount Vernon, Va., home as well as at the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

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NC lawmaker proposes bill that would no longer require permit to carry guns

RALEIGH, N.C. – A Cabarrus County lawmaker introduced a bill Wednesday that would allow North Carolinians to carry a concealed handgun without the need of a concealed carry permit.

House Bill 69, otherwise known as the Constitutional Carry Act, was presented by Republican Representative Larry Pittman. The bill was also sponsored by three additional Republican representatives.

The current concealed carry law in North Carolina requires an applicant to take and pass a safety and training course that involves the actual firing of handguns and understanding of North Carolina gun laws.

READ: House Bill 69

Dan Starks, a longtime gun safety instructor in Charlotte, isn’t worried that the new law will give criminals an easier path to weapons. He says they’ll get them regardless of the laws in place.

“The guns law only affect law abiding citizens,” Starks said.

Starks is concerned, however, that a lack of training and gun safety knowledge could have a negative impact on public safety.

“I think it makes good sense but the question is what kind of training do people have?”

“People carrying a gun without a permit would be like allowing people to drive without having to have a license,” Starks explained. “You get a license because it requires you to learn how to drive, (as well as) the laws. It’s the same thing with a handgun.

“If you’re going to carry a deadly weapon in public, it’s absolutely mandatory that you understand the laws as far as you using it.”

Source

 

Cops seized his weapon, so gun shop gave him a new Smith & Wesson .38 Special

While dozens of people dined on fried chicken and Southern vegetables, Billy Harrell was staring down the barrel of a gun.

The 66-year-old manager of the Ole Times Country Buffet in Dublin had noticed two men walking down the sidewalk as he went to his SUV in the parking lot at about 7:30 p.m. Friday.

One of them walked up with a gun and demanded Harrell’s money.

When the Telfair County resident said he didn’t have any, the gunman made him sit in the vehicle as the robber rifled through the console and glove compartment.

The robber grabbed a pistol and some other items from the vehicle and started to leave.

When he turned back around with his gun pointed, Harrell fired a shot from another weapon he had concealed in the car, hitting 21-year-old Devin Wilbert.

“He’s done a good thing,” Harrell’s hometown sheriff, Chris Steverson said.

Down the road, Dublin police quickly arrested Wilbert’s alleged accomplice, 22-year-old Quantavis Jones, who was wearing clothes that matched surveillance images.

Investigators had to take both of Harrell’s guns as evidence, which prompted the sheriff to post Harrell’s plight on Facebook.

Springfield Armory® 1911 EMP® Four-inch Lightweight Champion™ Earns Golden Bullseye Award

Springfield Armory® is honored to receive the 2017 American Rifleman Women’s Innovation Product of the Year Golden Bullseye Award for the 1911 EMP® Four-inch Lightweight Champion™ pistol.

Introduced in 2016, the EMP® Four-inch Lightweight Champion™ is a natural extension to what many customers consider the most elegant and shootable carry pistol ever, the Springfield Armory® EMP®. With a new short-action design and 17 patented internal components, the EMP® exhibits the re-engineering of the best attributes of the classic 1911 design into a compact, and utterly reliable, 9mm or .40 S&W package.

“We’re very proud of all the hard work we’ve invested in the EMP® family,” stated Dennis Reese, Springfield Armory® Chief Executive Officer. “It’s so much more than a downsized 1911. Our engineering team created a carry pistol that is not only imminently shootable but exceptionally reliable. We’re tremendously honored that the NRA’s prestigious American Rifleman magazine chose the EMP® Four-inch Lightweight Champion™ to receive the Women’s Innovation Product of the Year Golden Bullseye Award.”

The Golden Bullseye Awards will be presented at a special breakfast event on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the National Rifle Association Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Atlanta, Georgia.

“We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 Golden Bullseye Awards,” said Doug Hamlin, Executive Director of NRA Publications. “This year’s winners exemplify what NRA members want in their shooting and hunting equipment—outstanding performance, innovative design, and value. We congratulate those who have created the industry’s best new products and look forward to recognizing them in Atlanta.”

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Win The Hulk’s Gun

GRINNELL, Iowa (February 7, 2017) – It’s not every day the general public gets a chance to win a gun crafted from the dreams of a bona fide celebrity. However, Brownells and Lou Ferrigno have turned that idea into a reality.

Unveiled at SHOT Show 2017, Lou Ferrigno’s Big Green Dream Gun® is a sight to behold. Working off of the Fightlite MCR-103 belt-fed AR-15 platform, the Brownells crew outfitted the fire-breathing beast with an Elcan optic, Keymod™ handguards and an Atlas bipod for supreme stability.

Brownells then called in support from Battle Arms Development to apply the custom, mutant-green paint job that covers nearly the entire rifle. All in, the firearm is valued at approximately $7,200.

“Our Dream Guns show off our huge selection of aftermarket parts and accessories while inspiring our customers to build the firearm of their dreams,” said Brownells CEO Pete Brownell. “This Dream Gun is different though. It’s Lou Ferrigno’s Dream Gun, and one lucky winner will take it home.”

The firearm will be on display at various shows and events in 2017, most notably the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Atlanta, Georgia, this coming April 27-30, in the Brownells booth. Lou Ferrigno will be on hand during the NRA Show to meet and greet booth visitors.

Customers can also sign up with win the firearm online at www.brownells.com/biggreen. The sweepstakes end on May 1, 2017; sweepstakes rules can be found on the sign up page.

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NFA-Free Suppressors, Shouldered Braces, and Armor Piercing Ammo, Oh My!

In what appears to fly in the face of the Bureau’s prior attitudes towards enforcement of gun laws, a white paper by BATFE Associate  Deputy Director Ronald Turk was recently leaked which proposed loosening or modifying gun regulations in sixteen ways, to be discussed below. If you have not yet read Nicholas’ post on the leak, you can do that, and also follow the link here to the white paper itself. In this article, I’ll be taking a (hopefully) brief look at what the white paper means and why it’s so significant (and it is significant, don’t get me wrong).

First, we must understand what the white paper isn’t. It is not a new set of regulations, and it is not an announcement that regulations will soon change. It’s more like a memorandum containing suggestions that could be implemented in the future. Indeed, the entire document is worded this way, making it very clear. It even says, in the executive summary:

This paper serves to provide the new Administration and the Bureau multiple options to consider and discuss regarding firearms regulations specific to ATF. These general thoughts provide potential ways to reduce or modify regulations, or suggest changes that promote commerce and defend the Second Amendment without significant negative impact on ATF’s mission to fight violent firearms crime and regulate the firearms industry. This white paper is intended to provide ideas and provoke conversation; it is not guidance or policy of any kind.”

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Vietnam veteran turns tables on would-be robbers, shooting both

EDWARDSVILLE —Two would-be robbers had the tables turned on them Thursday, resulting in charges of first-degree murder for one of the attempted robbers.

Madison County State’s Attorney Tom Gibbons announced first-degree murder charges Friday against Perry A. Richardson, 23, in connection with a shooting that took place on Thursday morning in Venice.

Venice police were dispatched to the 200 block of Abbott Street around 10 a.m. on Feb. 2 in response to reports of shots fired. Upon arrival, officers discovered the body of Billy D. Dickerson, 19, inside his car. Dickerson, a resident of St. Louis, was pronounced dead at the scene.

During the course of the investigation, investigators with the Illinois State Police determined that Dickerson and Richardson approached and attempted to rob at gunpoint two individuals sitting in a vehicle in front of a residence on Abbott Street. One of the victims, a 70-year-old Vietnam veteran from St. Louis, pulled his gun and fired on the would-be robbers, striking both Dickerson and Richardson. Dickerson, the driver, was struck in the head; Richardson, the passenger, was struck in the arm and chest. The victim is authorized to possess a concealed firearm in his home state of Missouri.

“Self-defense is an inalienable right in a free society and the right to keep and bear arms is enshrined in the Second Amendment. The courts have consistently recognized the right of a law-abiding citizen to carry a concealed weapon for the purpose of self-defense. This incident yesterday morning is the exact situation where the necessity for this right becomes crystal clear,” said Gibbons, who also participates in concealed carry. “I have said it before and I will not waver from this position – I say to all criminals thinking about committing violent crimes in Madison County – if you come here to commit your crimes, do not be surprised if you end up on the wrong side of the concealed weapon of a law-abiding citizen. We will not tolerate violent crime and we will defend ourselves, our loved ones and our community from the harm you intend to bring.”

Gibbons also commended the work of the officers with the Illinois State Police and the Venice Police Department for their investigation that led to Friday’s charges.

Richardson was transported to SLU Hospital for medical treatment. Upon release, he will be brought to the Madison County Jail in Edwardsville where he will be held without bond. Maximum penalty for first-degree murder is 20-60 years in prison. If convicted, Richardson will be required to serve 100 percent of his sentence.

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