Smith & Wesson Announces New M&P Shield® M2.0™ Pistol Series

Smith Wesson Mp2Crimsontrace

SPRINGFIELD, Mass., (October 16, 2017) – Smith & Wesson Corp. today announced the launch of its new M&P Shield M2.0 pistol series, including the M&P Shield M2.0 pistol with Integrated Crimson Trace® Laser. Available in 9mm and .40 S&W, the M&P Shield M2.0 pistol family builds upon the popular M&P M2.0 platform, delivering professional-grade features and proven performance in a slim, lightweight, and easy-to-carry profile that incorporates the enhanced M2.0 feature set.

James Debney, President, and CEO of American Outdoor Brands Corporation said, “When we launched the M&P Shieldpistol, it quickly became the pistol of choice in the concealed carry market.  Having recently shipped our 2-millionth M&PShield pistol we are now excited to build upon its success by introducing our newest Shield in the popular M&P M2.0 seriesof products.  As personal protection continues to be a leading driver for consumers purchasing a handgun, the M&P Shield M2.0 pistol and M&P Shield M2.0 pistol with Integrated Crimson Trace Laser both provide an all-in-one package for those looking for an everyday carry firearm.”

The M&P Shield M2.0 pistol builds upon the success of the best-selling M&P Shield pistol line through notable enhancements, including the M&P M2.0 crisp trigger with lighter trigger pull, a tactile and audible trigger reset, and aggressive grip texture for enhanced control.  Those familiar with the M&P Shield product line will recognize the familiar, slim profile and 18-degree grip angle for a natural point of aim.  Available with or without a manual thumb safety, the M&P Shield M2.0 pistol series features a 3.1” barrel in both 9mm and .40 S&W, is available with both white dot sights or tritium night sights, and ships with one standard and one extended grip magazine.

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1 suspect killed, 1 charged in Hattiesburg home invasion

One man was killed and another arrested Sunday night during a home invasion in Hattiesburg.

Hattiesburg police responded to the home invasion around 9:30 p.m. Sunday in the 100 block of Orange Street.

The homeowners said two men rushed into their home, displayed a hand gun and demanded money, Hattiesburg police spokeswoman Lt. LaTosha Myers-Mitchell said.

One of the suspects, Justin Woodland, 17, of Hattiesburg was shot by the homeowner. He was transported to Forrest General Hospital, where he later was pronounced dead.

The second suspect, Anton Smith, 29, of Hattiesburg was charged with burglary of a dwelling, armed robbery and leaving the scene an accident. He was booked into Forrest County Jail.

No charges have been filed against the homeowner, but the investigation into the incident is ongoing.

Anyone who may have information about the incident is asked to call Hattiesburg police at (601) 544-7900 or Metro Crime Stoppers at (601) 582-7867.

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Tennessee Hero Uses His Gun To Stop A Deadly Church Shooter

A man in a mask opened fire at a church in Antioch, Tennessee on Sunday morning, injuring seven people and killing a woman who was walking to her car. Police say the gunman, whom they suspect is 25-year-old Emanuel Kidega Samson, entered Burnette Chapel Church of Christ and “began indiscriminately shooting” people inside the main sanctuary. Luckily, a brave church usher stopped the gunman in his tracks.

When 22-year-old Caleb Engle first confronted the gunman, the shooter pistol-whipped him, authorities say. During this initial struggle, the suspect shot himself in the chest, giving Engle — a licensed gun owner — time to get his gun from his car. Police say Engle used his gun to make sure the suspect didn’t try to make a move before help arrived.

“He’s the hero,” said Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson, according to NBC News. “He’s the person who stopped this madness.”

Engle says police are the ones who deserve the credit for saving the day.

“The real heroes are the police, first responders and medical staff and doctors who have helped me and everyone affected,” Engle said.

Samson, who is believed to have come to the United States from Sudan in 1996, has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder. He is being held without bond and police say he will be charged with additional crimes. Churchgoers said Samson used to attend Burnette Chapel Church of Christ more than a year ago, but officials are still piecing together what motivated the suspect to carry out this deadly rampage.

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Springfield releases new .40-caliber 1911 EMP pistol

Springfield Armory released Monday the next logical caliber for the 1911 EMP concealed carry contour model, a new variant chambered in .40 S&W.

While it’s the same design, the Illinois-based gun maker modified the gun’s construction for the larger cartridge by replacing the aluminum alloy frame with a carbon steel that’s finished in Black-T and a rounded off heel and mainspring housing.

Springfield touts that what makes the EMP design popular is its “concealed carry contour design,” as the gun has a slim single-stack design and reduced dimensions of the grip frame. Engineers compressed the 1911 platform, which was originally designed for .45, and designed it around the 9mm cartridge. This process meant altering every mechanism of the action.

The new Springfield EMP design maintains many of the same features as its former like the contoured grip that removes part of the grip that tends to print. A satin finish 416 stainless steel slide has rear cocking serrations and a 3-dot sight system which employs a red fiber optic in front and a low profile white dot sight in back. The 4-inch stainless steel, match-grade bushing-less bull barrel incorporates a fully supported ramp.

Also, the frame’s frontstraps and main spring housing are both treated with an aggressive Posi-Lock golf ball dimple texturing. Coupled with thin-line G10 panels featuring the same texture provides a grip designed to provide maximum comfort and control. An ambidextrous thumb safety makes it southpaw friendly too.

Unloaded, the new EMP pistol weighs 33 ounces, measures 5-inches in height and 6.6 inches in length, it comes with three eight-round magazines, and retails for $1,249.

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SHARE Act Critical To Hunters And Shooters

U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-S.C., has introduced a new measure designed to reduce burdensome regulations on America’s sportsmen, enhance access to public lands and simplify the purchasing process for firearm suppressors.

Called the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act, H.R. 3668 is being touted as “critical” by the National Rifle Association.

“The SHARE Act is critical legislation that will protect America’s hunters and recreational shooters and help preserve our outdoor heritage,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action. “This bill contains many important reforms to federal law that will remove unnecessary restrictions on our Second Amendment freedoms and hunting heritage.”

Several different versions of the SHARE Act have been considered in Congress over the past several years, and the legislation has passed the U.S. House of Representatives during each of the last three sessions of Congress, according to a report at nraila.org. Few, however, expected that then-President Barack Obama would have signed the bill into law. Fortunately, there’s no such roadblock with President Donald Trump now in the White House.

The measure is a many-faceted bill that addresses a number of important issues. Among other things, it would clarify and strengthen the Firearm Owners’ Protection Act of 1986, which protects the lawful transport of firearms from one location where they are legal to another. These reforms more clearly delineate what behavior is protected and provide remedies for persons whose rights under FOPA are violated.

The bill also contains the Lawful Purpose and Self-Defense Act, aimed at ensuring the Second Amendment’s core purpose of self-defense is adequately considered in the administration of federal firearms law. Currently, several federal laws that regulate the importation, possession and transfer of firearms and ammunition measure their lawful utility based on their usefulness for so-called “sporting purposes,” which can be—and has been—exploited by anti-gun administrations and bureaucrats.

Another important part of the SHARE Act is the Recreational Lands Self-Defense Act. Federal law already recognizes the right of law-abiding Americans to carry firearms for self-defense when camping or hiking on National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System lands by incorporating the firearm carry laws of the states in which the lands are located. This portion of the SHARE Act would extend that same rule to the 11.7 million acres of land administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which includes 400 lakes and river projects, 90,000 campsites, and 4,000 miles of trails.

Finally, the SHARE Act includes the Hearing Protection Act (HPA), which would eliminate burdensome and expensive regulations on suppressors. The HPA would remove firearm sound suppressors from regulation under the National Firearms Act, eliminating the $200 transfer tax on these items and decreasing the red tape and long processing times currently associated with their purchase.

“On behalf of America’s gun owners and sportsmen, I would like to thank Rep. Duncan for introducing this important legislation,” Cox added. “All Americans deserve access to our rich outdoor heritage and the tools that help making hunting and shooting safer.”

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Authorities identify suspected intruder who was fatally shot during apparent home invasion

DOWNEY — Authorities have identified the suspected intruder who was killed by a homeowner during an apparent home invasion early Friday morning in this southern Bannock County town.

Joseph Lloyd, 34, of Pocatello, was fatally shot by the homeowner around 4 a.m. Friday while forcing his way through the door of the residence on Barnes Lane off Highway 40 just west of Downey city limits, according to the Bannock County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities said no charges are pending against the man who killed Lloyd because all indications are that the man opened fire in defense of himself and other family members who were at home at the time.

Lloyd was struck by the gunfire and died at the scene — prior to the arrival of responding sheriff’s deputies.

The Sheriff’s Office said an autopsy is being performed on Lloyd to determine how many times he was shot.

Authorities said based on their findings thus far in the investigation all indications are that Lloyd was invading the home when he was killed.

The Sheriff’s Office is not yet commenting on what type of gun was used to kill Lloyd or whether Lloyd was armed as well.

Lloyd has a criminal record and was released from the Bannock County Jail about two weeks ago after being arrested on a felony drug charge, authorities said.

The name of the man who killed Lloyd is not going to be released, the Sheriff’s Office said.

The Sheriff’s Office does want to make it clear that it appears Lloyd was acting alone and “there is no evidence indicating any further threat” to public safety as a result of the apparent home invasion.

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Taco Bell Workers Kill Armed Robber During Failed Robbery Operation

Three employees from a Taco Bell store in Cleveland reportedly shot and killed an armed robber when he and a partner tried to rob the store on Wednesday, Sept. 6.

Reports claimed that the three male workers from the fast food chain whose names were unrevealed were also armed when the two masked robbers entered the restaurant at 2:45 a.m. on Wednesday to get cash from the register.

The Taco Bell employees were reported to have opened fire and shot one of the robbers in the ribs while the other one managed to escape.

The local police officers arrived at the restaurant after the incident, where they discovered the attempted robber lying unconscious on the ground while holding a loaded gun in his hand. According to reports, the suspected robber has received a total of six shots. He was later on pronounced dead when he was brought to the MetroHealth Medical Center.

The medical examiner reportedly identified the suspected robber as a 24-year-old Cleveland resident named DeCarlo Jackson.

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Tested: Carolina Arms Group Trenton Tactical

The M1911 pistol market continues to expand at a rate that defies easy explanation. Today, an example of this classic firearm can be purchased from almost every major handgun manufacturer. And while entry-level .45s still exist, most M1911s today come with a variety of cosmetic or functional upgrades, and the biggest trend is for firms to build high-end versions, right from scratch.

One company that is fairly new to the market—and that is the maker of the gun reviewed here—is Carolina Arms Group. This North Carolina-based firm is heavily staffed with veterans, and has a declared dedication to producing the best possible versions of the classic M1911-pattern handgun. Its first product, the Trenton pistol, is named for the reliability-under-stress character displayed by the ragged soldiers of George Washington’s Continental Army in the Battle of Trenton, N.J., on Dec. 26, 1776.

For this report, it provided a sample Trenton Tactical chambered in .45 ACP. The gun is made from forged carbon steel finished in a flat, tactical black color. Contours are of the familiar M1911A1 pattern, with manual and grip safeties, a Commander-style hammer and a left-side magazine release. A departure from the norm is the full-length recoil spring guide. Carolina Arms manufactures most of its own small parts in house.

The pistol’s beavertail grip safety has been hand-fitted to the frame (l.). The Trenton Tactical pairs a black, wide-notch, combat-style Dawson Precision rear sight with a red fiber-optic front sight, both of which are drift-adjustable (r.).

From a distance, the Trenton has the typical M1911 look and could be confused with other makers’ products. But its high levels of fit and internal finish are readily apparent when cycling the slide and dry firing the gun. There is little play in the fit of the slide to the frame—only enough to ensure they function properly together. That movement is very smooth, as is the shorter travel of the overtravel-adjustable trigger in its slot. The trigger break was crisp after the typical amount of slack, and measured right at the manufacturer’s stated 4-lb. specification. Like most modern guns of this pattern, the Trenton has a beavertail grip safety, and, in this case, it appears to have been perfectly fitted to the receiver. The Trenton’s thumb safety is bilateral, while the hammer is a skeletonized version of the round Commander style. There are angled cocking serrations at the rear of the slide.

Several useful shooter amenities have been worked into the Trenton design. Crafted from G10 laminate, the gray-black stocks by VZ Grips feature a coarse pattern of vertical channels accented with lateral grooves. This aggressive pattern is abrasive, but works well for shooters who need some extra texturing to help them hold on to the gun while firing. A further positive grip comes from an attractive but functional treatment applied to the frontstrap and mainspring housing. Instead of checkering or vertical grooving, these surfaces bear a series of overlapping oval-shaped depressions that work well to enhance purchase.

The Trenton’s designers may have wanted to build a very traditional gun, but they also included several modern enhancements for practical use. The front sight is a red-fiber-optic unit, as used on a number of other modern guns, which is matched with a Dawson Precision rear sight with a black sighting surface and a wide notch. It is an arrangement well-suited to a variety of shooting situations. The Carolina Arms Group marks its new pistol with a stylized eagle head and wing, contoured into a letter “C.” Logos appear on both sides of the slide and both stocks; the slide also reads “Carolina Arms Group” on the left and “Trenton” on the right.

One additional feature needs to be mentioned. The maker’s pistols all feature barrels manufactured by Kart, which are designed for installation by professional gunsmiths. Kart-made barrels have earned a reputation for exceptional accuracy.

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Marine Corps selects Safran Optics’ gun-mounted rangefinder

Safran Optics 1 Inc. announced Friday that the U.S. Marine Corps will be buying its Integrated Compact Ultralight Gun-mounted Rangefinder for its snipers.

The I-CUGR is a small, lightweight, and rugged weapon-mounted laser rangefinder with integrated illumination and aiming lasers that will give the Marine Corps the ability to quickly range targets without taking hands off their rifles — providing more accurate first round hits, the company said in a release.

“We appreciate the opportunity to continue working closely with the U.S. Marine Corps in providing the Marines with superior technology that provides precise and accurate targeting solutions,” said Jose Andrade, Optics 1 business development manager and a retired Marine Corps sergeant major. “The selection of the I-CUGR solidifies the confidence in our commitment to providing technologies that are light yet powerful and are critical to the success of the USMC’s mission requirements.”

The I-CUGR was designed by Optics 1 leveraging rangefinder technology from Safran Electronics & Defense. Production will take place in Bedford at Optics 1. The initial order is for 315 units with deliveries beginning this year.

Safran Optics employs about 80 people at its Bedford location and nearly 100 companywide. Production takes place inside of a three-story, 51,572-square-foot building housed at 2 Cooper Lane.

Originally known as Optics 1 , the company was founded by Robert Fischer, a California-based optical engineer, designer and former chief scientist for Hughes Aircraft. The Safran Group acquired Optics 1 through Vectronix in 2009 to pursue more opportunities in the U.S. market. Last year, Vectronix Inc. merged with Optics 1 Inc., its U.S.-based research and development subsidiary, and now the company is known as Safran Optics 1, a wholly owned subsidiary of Vectronix AG and a part of Safran Electronics & Defense, a Safran group company.

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79-year-old thwarts would-be robber with concealed firearm

 Police say that a 79-year-old Stanton man thwarted a would-be robber after pulling out his concealed firearm.

Andrew Yanez, 24, has been charged and arrested for Attempted Robbery and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

According to the Stanton Police Department, the elderly man was leaving a convenience store Friday afternoon when he was approached by a suspect.

The suspect then demanded keys to his vehicle, stating “It would be best for you to give me the keys, I want your car” and implied violence would be used, according to police.

It was then that the victim who was licensed to carry a handgun drew his concealed firearm and pointed it towards the suspect, who fled the scene on foot.

A description of the suspect was provided to police, and he was located two blocks away from the scene and was identified as Yanez.

According to police, Yanez was found to have a semi-automatic handgun in his possession. He was then arrested and booked into the Martin County Jail.

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13-Year-Old Boy Home Alone, Shoots Intruders

A 13-year-old South Carolina boy used his mother’s gun to fend off two home intruders while he was home alone.

According to The Post and Courier, one man was shot and killed by the 13-year-old, while the other was later caught and arrested.

Lamar Anthwan Brown, 31, of Summerville, South Carolina, was pronounced dead at a medical center after suffering gunshot wounds in the burglary. Brown was dropped off at the hospital by the other suspect, Ira Bennett, 28, of North Charleston, after the pair fled the Ladson home where the shooting took place.

Bennett was later arrested and charged with first-degree burglary and possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime.

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This Bill Would Allow Conceal-Carry Rights to Transfer State-to-State

Another layer has been added to the gun control controversy due to a new bill from Congress. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 (H.R. 38) will allow people with conceal and carry rights to keep those rights when traveling across state lines. They would be allowed to enter school zones and public federal land, but they would have to meet certain qualifications. This means they must be eligible to possess, transport, or receive a firearm under federal law, carry a valid photo identification document, and carry a valid concealed carry permit (send your opinion to your rep here.)

Those who support the bill argue it is too difficult for law-abiding concealed carry permit holders to travel out of state and keep their rights. They have to negotiate a confusing maze of laws, reciprocity agreements, and recognition statutes to keep a right they already have. They also argue that recent gun violence in public places shows the need for more gun carrying citizens.

Those in opposition to the law argue that the state-by-state conceal-carry gun laws differ too much for this bill to work. States with tougher requirements would have to allow people from other states with fewer requirements to carry their firearms. Each state knows what is best for its own residents, so forcing another state’s laws onto them would put people in danger.

And there’s still time to weigh in before Congress votes, so be sure to send your opinion to your rep here with one click! We’ll alert you if and when Congress votes and share your rep’s vote with you.

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The world’s tiniest gun fits in your wallet

A firearms manufacturer has designed a folding handgun that can deliver a deadly shot — despite being the same size as a credit card.

The tiny shooter — which can hold five .22 rounds — is the same dimensions as a stack of credit cards and can fit in a wallet.

The Lifecard.22LR, known as “the last gun you’ll leave behind,” is small enough to fit in a wallet and weighs just 7 ounces — less than a Big Mac.

Manufacturers say the mini gun boasts a steel barrel, bolt and trigger and extra ammunition storage for four extra rounds.

The company behind the gun, Trailblazer Firearms, is said to have been working on the concept for the LifeCard for seven years.

Trailblazer president Aaron Voigt, who has served in both the Marine Corps and the US Army said: “New designs and true innovation have been the exception and our goal is to be the pioneer laying new trails for gun enthusiasts, designers and manufacturers.

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60-year-old woman shoots, kills home invasion suspect

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK/CNN) – A 60-year-old Texas woman shot and killed an intruder during a home invasion, authorities said.

Harris County deputies said two men entered the house through an open garage door and tried to rob the woman, who was at home alone. Both suspects were reportedly armed with pistols.

The woman grabbed her gun and fired multiple shots at the duo, deputies said.

One of the men died from his injuries. The other suspect jumped a fence and ran away.

The homeowner told investigators she did not know the men.

Investigators are trying to determine if this was a crime of opportunity, or if the two men targeted her home specifically.

Some neighbors were upset about the shooting, while others, like Catherine Hanks, applauded her for fighting back.

“In the state of Texas, if you’re gonna get on somebody’s property, you’re gonna get shot,” Hanks said. “That’s just the way we are, that’s Texas.”

Police have not yet tracked down that second suspect.

It’s unclear if he sustained any injuries when the homeowner fired her gun at him.

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Smith & Wesson Adds Model 360 Revolver to J-Frame Lineup

Smith & Wesson Corp. has begun shipping the new Model 360 revolver, the manufacturer’s latest addition to its popular J-Frame revolver line. The revolver offers consumers a new choice to meet their needs for a lightweight, powerful concealed-carry revolver for personal protection. The Model 360 features a scandium alloy frame, unfluted stainless steel cylinder, Flat Dark Earth combat grips, and is chambered in the .357 Magnum cartridge. 

Jan Mladek, general manager for Smith & Wesson and M&P Brands, said, “With the growing popularity of concealed-carry firearms, Smith & Wesson has continued to innovate in the popular J-frame revolver category. The Model 360, chambered in .357 Magnum and weighing only 14.9 oz., is a powerful and easy-to-carry option for those looking for a new concealed-carry sidearm.”

The Model 360 features a black finish, five-round capacity and Red Ramp front sight for quick target acquisition.

MSRP: $770

For more information visit smith-wesson.com

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State Attorney Generals: Being Armed Not the Same as Being Dangerous

State Attorney Generals (AG) from Michigan, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia are asking the Supreme Court of the United States to review a 4th U.S. Circuit Court ruling and reaffirm that being armed is not the same thing as being dangerous.

The AGs — Bill Schuette (MI), Ken Paxton (TX), Sean D. Rayes (UT), and Patrick Morrisey (WV) — are convinced the 4th Circuit made a mistake in ruling that individuals who carry guns can constitutionally be searched, simply for having a gun.

According to the Associated Press, in January, the 4th Circuit ruled that “an officer who makes a lawful traffic stop and who has a reasonable suspicion that one of the automobile’s occupants is armed may frisk that individual for the officer’s protection and the safety of everyone on the scene.” Judge Paul Niemeyer wrote the majority opinion, saying, “The danger justifying a protective frisk arises from the combination of a forced police encounter and the presence of a weapon, not from any illegality of the weapon’s possession.”

AG Morrisey responded to the ruling, saying, “It is wrong to deem an individual dangerous solely because they are armed.” And AG Paxton contends the ruling “places a burden on the Second Amendment right to carry a firearm.”

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Homeowner shoots 2 men after home invasion in Columbia Township

Hamilton County Sheriff’s Deputies say they responded to the 3500 block of Kenoak Lane in Columbia Township at approximately 3:15 a.m., Saturday morning after a homeowner and his family were startled by two intruders who broke into their home.

Police say the homeowner first retrieved a hammer and confronted both men. After a struggle ensued, police say the homeowner then retrieved a gun and shot both men.

The men fled in a vehicle but were located a short distance away in Cincinnati. Both were taken to University of Cincinnati Medical Center where one is listed in critical condition and the other in stable condition.

Police have not released the names of anyone involved.

Hamilton County Sheriff’s Criminal Investigative Section is investigating and ask the public with any information to call 513-851-6000 or Crimestoppers at 513-352-3040.

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Approval for concealed weapons permits made easier for military

BAY COUNTY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – Florida’s Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam announced Wednesday at the National Guard Armory in Panama City that the state has expedited concealed weapons permits for more than 80,000 active military and veterans.

With this in effect, members of the military automatically get taken care of first. This shortens the process of getting a concealed carry permit from a couple months to just a few days.

The change came after a shooting at a military reserve in Chattanooga, Tennessee two years ago where members of the military were killed.

Putnam and Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis mentioned ISIS posted the names and addresses of men and women in the military on the internet. They say members of the military have become targets inside the United States.

“If they mail in their application, if they come to a regional office, they are processed first,” Commissioner Putnam said. “The use of that DD-214 [form] is a flag to move them to the top of the stack and make sure that active duty military and veterans are getting the protection they need.”

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Armed With Her Dad’s Gun, This 17-Year-Old Girl Fended Off A Wanted Man Who Broke Into Her Home

A 17-year-old girl defended herself with her dad’s gun from a wanted car thief who broke into her home while she slept Monday morning.

When Kimber Wood of Spokane County, Washington awoke, it was to the sound of someone breaking into her home. Luckily, her parents had warned her there was a suspected car thief on the loose in their area, so she had slept with her dad’s gun under her pillow, KHQ reports.

Police say they initially saw a stolen car early Monday morning, but that the suspect evaded authorities and fled on foot. KHQ reported the incident on “The Wake Up Show,” which Kimber’s parents saw before they left for work.

With the gun in hand, the teen hid behind her makeup vanity, waiting for the intruder to come closer. When the man approached her, she pointed the gun at him and demanded that he leave.

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Smith & Wesson Launches M&P Summer Rebate

Smith & Wesson announced the launch of the company’s new mail-in rebate offer, the “M&P Summer Savings,” which applies to the company’s line of M&P pistols, including the M&P Shield.

“We are excited to announce the ‘M&P Summer Savings’ mail-in rebate program this summer on some of our most popular firearms,” said Matt Buckingham, president of Smith & Wesson. “We’ve worked with Hornady ammunition and Caldwell shooting supplies to create an ideal accessories package, whether you are in the market for a full-size or concealed carry M&P firearm.”

Any consumers that purchase an M&P pistol, whether it’s a full-size, compact or Shield, can submit a rebate to receive a Caldwell Mag Charger Universal Pistol Loader, two boxes of Hornady Critical Defense ammo and two spare magazines for their particular handgun. The total value of the offer is $180, and it can be had absolutely free with a simple completed form.

The rebate program applies to all M&P handguns purchased between July 1 to Sept. 30, 2017. To receive the rebate offer, consumers can choose three different ways to complete the form. First, the form is available online at the Smith & Wesson Perfect Summer Hideaway Rebate site and can be completed and submitted on the company’s website. The form can also be downloaded and mailed to the company. Finally, consumers can obtain a paper copy of the rebate form from their Smith & Wesson dealer and mail in the completed form. The form must also include proof of purchase and must be sent into the company before Oct. 31, 2017.

Smith & Wesson also announced that customers living in Alaska, Hawaii and states with magazine-capacity restrictions or limits on ammo transfers will receive a $75 cash rebate when they buy their handgun.

For more details on the Smith & Wesson Perfect Summer Hideaway Rebate offer, visit the company’s rebate website here.

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Neighbors call gun toting mom a hero

TARPON SPRINGS, Fla. – A Clearwater man is behind bars and a woman has her neighbor to thank for saving her life.

Neighbors at Pine Ridge at Lake Tarpon are in awe of how one mom stepped in to help her neighbor, even risking her own safety.

31-year-old Brittany Cheek didn’t hesitate for a single second. When she heard her neighbor screaming, she grabbed her gun, and took action. Carolyn Lubecki says that makes her a hero, “Just an amazing act of bravery.”

Lubecki called 911 when she heard screams. She explained, “You kind of panic in situations and thank god Brittany Cheek didn’t. She didn’t think twice.”

Pinellas County deputies say 18-year-old Daniel Morley, wearing only his boxers, started pounding on the door of the condo at 1344 Pine Ridge Circle East around 4 a.m. on Saturday.

Susan Bass noticed the man was bleeding and opened her door to help. Instead, Morley attacked her. That’s when Bass’ neighbor across the hall grabbed her gun and shot Morley in the leg. Cheek’s 3-year-old son was just a few feet away.

Tammy Harrison, the owner of a female-oriented gun shop called Girls Gun Wild in Largo, says more women are packing heat to stay safe.

“We’re all in that boat right now. It can happen to any of us at any time.”

Harrison’s business has doubled in the past two years with women now arming themselves with handguns.

“It sort of pushes you over the fence to hear of crimes like this. Like hey, she protected her 3-year-old, that could have been me,” she said enthusiastically.

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How male and female gun owners in the U.S. compare

About six-in-ten gun owners in the United States are male (62%). Still, about one-in-five women (22%) report that they own a gun. While these women resemble their male counterparts in some respects, their views on and experiences with guns often differ from those of male gun owners.

Here are seven ways that female and male gun owners compare, based on a recent Pew Research Center survey of 1,269 gun owners.

1Women who own guns tend to become gun owners at a later age than men.On average, women who own a gun or have owned one in the past report that they first got their own gun when they were 27 years old, compared with an average of 19 for men who own or have owned guns.

2Women are more likely than men to cite protection – rather than recreation – as the only reason they own a gun. Male and female gun owners are about equally likely to cite protection as a reason why they own guns: About nine-in-ten in each group say this is a reason, and 65% and 71%, respectively, say it is a majorreason. But far larger shares of women than men who own guns say protection is the only reason they own a gun: About a quarter of women who own guns (27%) are in this category, compared with just 8% of men.

3Women who own guns are less likely than their male counterparts to say they go sport shooting or hunting, though substantial shares of women do so. About four-in-ten female gun owners (43%) say they go shooting or to a gun range often or sometimes; 58% of men who own guns say the same. And while 37% of male gun owners say they go hunting at least sometimes, 28% of women who own guns do so.

The differences between male and female gun owners when it comes to participating in hunting or shooting are linked, at least in part, to early exposure to these types of activities. Among current gun owners, 52% of men say they went hunting and 46% say they went shooting at least sometimes when they were growing up, compared with about a quarter of women (23%) who say they participated in each of these activities when they were young. The gaps in the shares of men and women who now go hunting or shooting virtually disappear when those who did and did not hunt or shoot growing up are considered separately.

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National concealed reciprocity bill picks up 200th supporter in House

National concealed reciprocity bill picks up 200th supporter in House

Legislation to treat concealed carry permits like drivers’ licenses nationwide is gaining steam in Congress while opponents dig in.

Introduced by U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson, R-NC, on the first day of session in the new House, the bill now enjoys the support of Hudson and 199 co-sponsors from 42 states. The bill is largely Republican, with three Democrats crossing the aisle, and is currently one of the top 10 most-viewed bills in Congress.

“Your driver’s license works in every state, so why doesn’t your concealed carry permit?” says a backgrounder on the bill circulated by Hudson’s office. “Just like your privilege to drive, your Second Amendment right does not disappear when you cross state lines. However, conflicting state codes have created a confusing patchwork of reciprocity agreements for concealed carry permit holders.”

Hudson’s bill would amend federal law to allow those eligible to possess a firearm to have a concealed handgun in any state that allows individuals to carry a pistol or revolver. Those who do so would have to carry a valid permit with them as well as a photo ID. The bill also applies to nonresident permit holders.

A companion measure, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn’s S.446, has 37 co-sponsors, all Republican.

While Second Amendment groups large and small support the legislation, gun control advocates have drawn a line in the sand to stop the bill, with former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Everytown organization pledging as much as $25 million to derail the campaign.

Astronaut and Navy Capt. Mark Kelly, co-founder with his wife– former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords — of Americans for Responsible Solutions, has often argued that national reciprocity violates states’ rights and constitutes a public safety threat, going on to describe it simply as “bad legislation” when speaking recently in the aftermath of an attack on House Republicans at a charity baseball practice.

The measure has been referred to the House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, but is not scheduled for a hearing.

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GOP Goes Quiet on Gun Silencers—for Now, at Least—After Congressional Shooting

By agreement among Republicans after Wednesday’s frightful shooting that left Majority Whip Steve Scalise in critical condition, yesterday was not the day to talk of gun control.

Not to worry, Republicans and National Rifle Association brass. Gun control advocates will wait a respectful moment before pointing out the absurdity of our gun laws so lax that even Justice Antonin Scalia said there should be restrictions. Or maybe they will wait much longer. Many have lost heart for the fight. If nothing got passed after small children at Sandy Hook, moviegoers, office workers, and partiers dancing the night away in Orlando were massacred—why would we think anything will happen now?

In fact, the talk that was permitted after the practice field shooting spree was largely about locking and loading and carrying. Three Harvard Business professors found that after a mass shooting, gun laws are more likely to be loosened than tightened. How’s that for counterintuitive behavior?

How about something NOT happening for a glimmer of hope? Yesterday a bill (the Hearing Protection Act!) that would allow silencers—those things that criminals use in the movies, and which are presently regulated more like machine guns than revolvers—was set for a hearing before the House Natural Resources Committee. It was canceled even before the leadership shut the entire House down for the day.

A wise move. Even if Republicans use their inside voices and talk nice, going on about the woes of hunters without silencers when it was the very sound of gunfire that allowed others at that field to run for cover, and for the Capitol Police to move to where the shots were coming from, would be particularly hard to take. Yes, perhaps we can be made to worry over the health of your ears and that of your hunting dogs. Just not today.

The bill to deregulate silencers has been bundled into a sportsmen’s package that might make it go down easier. It amends the National Firearms Act of 1934 to replace what the bill’s co-sponsor Rep. Jeff Duncan says is the outdated federal transfer process and its $200 fee with an instantaneous National Instant Criminal Background Check.

Duncan is so anxious to have people realize how useful silencers are (he prefers the Orwellian “suppressors”) that he hosted a demonstration earlier this month at a shooting range run by the Capitol Police in the Rayburn House Office Building. So many came, his press secretary Allen Klump said, they ran out of ammunition. As to what’s wrong with earplugs, Klump says, you have to be able to hear the wildlife before you see the wildlife in order to shoot the wildlife.

Proponents point out that a gun with a silencer is hardly silent. It reduces the sound by about 30 decibels to about the noise of a jackhammer. Maybe so, but who runs in the other direction at the sound of a jackhammer and what policeman runs towards it to suppress a shooter? To paraphrase the NRA, jackhammers don’t kill people.

The hearing hasn’t been rescheduled but the bill will get its day and likely pass this year with the support of Donald Trump and family. The president’s already signed a few gun bills and revoked a regulation that had prevented Social Security recipients with mental-health conditions from buying guns. His sons are hunters who’ve been photographed posing with everything but Cecil the Lion: a dead leopard, a crocodile, and a bloody elephant tail (they were culling the overpopulated herd) at a safari a few years ago.

Donald Jr. filmed a promotional spot for the Utah company Silenceco, named before suppressor replaced silencer as the term of art, in which he demonstrates the product and then says that for him the Second Amendment isn’t simply a “passion, it’s a lifestyle.”

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