Trump pushes for ban on gun ‘bump stocks’

US President Donald Trump has signed an order to ban bump-stock devices, which were used by a gunman who killed 58 Las Vegas concert-goers last year.

Speaking at the White House, Mr Trump said he had directed the Department of Justice to propose a law to make the accessories illegal.

The Republican president said that school safety was a “top priority” for his administration.

The gun control debate has been renewed by last week’s Florida school shooting.

Students and parents affected by that massacre, which left 17 dead, are planning a demonstration in the state capital of Tallahassee on Wednesday.

What did Trump say?

At an event on Tuesday recognising the bravery of law enforcement, Mr Trump said he had directed Attorney General Jeff Sessions to finalise new guidelines to declare bump stocks illegal “very soon”.

“The key in all of these efforts, as I said in my remarks the day after the shooting, is that we cannot merely take actions that make us feel like we are making a difference, we must actually make a difference,” he said.

“We must move past clichés and tired debates, and focus on evidence-based solutions and security measures that actually work and that make it easier for men and women of law enforcement to protect our children and protect our safety.”

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US military added 4,000 to gun ban list after Texas church massacre: report

The U.S. military has added more than 4,000 names of dishonorably discharged service members to a national background check system in the months since an ex-airman opened fire in a church, CNN reported.

Devin Kelley opened fire in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, in November, killing 26 people.

Kelley had been court-martialed in 2012 for assaulting his wife and stepson, and as a result should have been blocked from purchasing a firearm. However, the Air Force failed to submit his records to the FBI’s background check system.

In an effort to address the problem, the Department of Defense has worked to update the FBI’s background check system. The effort has led to an increase of 4,284 names added to the system based on dishonorable discharges, CNN reported.

The Texas church shooting prompted lawmakers to introduce legislation to strengthen the national background check system.

One bipartisan bill required states and agencies to produce plans for sending records to the National Instant Background Check System that would show if an individual is prohibited from buying a gun and verifying the information is accurate.

Another proposal in response to the shooting was aimed at eliminating the loophole that allowed Kelly to purchase a gun. It would require that the military report domestic violence convictions that were handled through court-martial to the background check system.

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Armed good Samaritan rescues cop under attack

SPRINGVILLE, Utah — An armed good Samaritan scared off a suspect who was pummeling a Utah officer.

KSTU reports that on Friday, the officer noticed a pair of feet dangling from a donation bin and ordered the suspect out of it. When the suspect, Paul Douglas Anderson, exited the bin, he ignored commands and began punching the officer in the face.

The suspect repeatedly struck the officer until a passerby, Derek Meyer, witnessed the attack and intervened.

Meyer, who has a concealed-carry permit, drew his weapon and ordered Anderson to get off of the officer. The suspect ran off. Officers eventually found the suspect hiding under a trailer and arrested him.

Corporal Cory Waters praised Meyer’s actions and said it made a huge difference.

“Had he not been in the right place at the right time, who knows what would have happened,” Waters said. “But he definitely stopped the attack from continuing and becoming much worse. He might have even saved either one of their lives. It could have gone really bad, even for the suspect.”

Meyer said he did it “because of who I am.”

“I carry a gun to protect me and those around me, but primarily I carry a gun to protect my family first and foremost,” Meyer said. “Outside of that, if I were to use my gun to protect anyone it would be law enforcement or military personnel.”

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