Top 25 Defensive Gun Uses of 2017

With 2017 quickly drawing to a close, Breitbart News thought the timing right to review the top 25 defensive gun uses (DGUs) of 2017.

And while it must be noted that these 25 examples are only a smidgen of the hundreds of thousands of DGUs that occur each year–see the academic work of Florida State University’s Gary Kleck–they nonetheless present a well-rounded summation of the various locations and circumstances in which law-abiding citizens use guns to defend their own lives and the lives of others.

Here are the top 25 DGUs of 2017:

January 2, 2017–Kay Dickinson was attacked while entering her Wilmington, North Carolina, apartment. WWAY repoted that Dickinson had just gotten off work and was going into her apartment at Colonial Parke when she was attacked.” The suspect held her at gunpoint, “beat her and then tied her up with a broken belt in her bedroom.” She was able to work free, retrieve her gun, and kill the suspect.

January 12, 2017–An concealed carry permit holder saw an Arizona State Trooper being beaten on the side of Interstate 10. The permit holder pulled over, asked the Trooper if he needed help, then intervened when the Trooper answered in the affirmative. The permit holder ordered the attacker to stop, then shot him dead after he refused to comply. It turned out that the suspect had shot the Trooper before the permit holder arrived, then climbed on top of him in a rage and began beating him on the side of the road. The permit holder saved the Trooper’s life.

January 20, 2017–Charlotte, North Carolina’s Kim Badger was attacked in “broad daylight” by a home invasion suspect armed with a baseball bat. WCNC reported that the attacker struck Badger with the bat, then pursued her through the house. Throughout the attack Badger fought to deny the suspect control of a knife that was on a counter and, eventually, to deny him access to a sword. Badger’s teenage son joined the fight to keep the suspect away from the sword. As the son fought, the mother retrieved her gun and shot the suspect dead.

January 29, 2017–Two masked suspects entered West Philadelphia’s Eagele’s Corner Chinese takeout and “announced a robbery.” According to 6 ABC, police indicated that two store owners were present at the time and one of the owners pulled a gun and opened fire. The owner opened fire, causing both of the suspects to flee. One of the suspects was struck by the owner’s gunfire and was arrested after his accomplice drove him to the hospital for treatment.

February 9, 2017–A legally armed citizen in Holland, Michigan, shot and critically wounded a suspect who would not stop assaulting a woman inside a convenience store. Holland Police issued a press release recounting the incident by explaining that “the suspect violently punched the victim several times and threw her down to the ground, and it is at that point that the [armed] customer arrives and tries to intervene.”  The suspect then turned and attacked the customer who was trying to intervene, leading the customer to open fire. The suspect was shot twice and hospitalized in critical condition.

Homeowner kills man during home invasion gun battle

Authorities say a homeowner shot and killed one of several men who broke into his North Carolina home.

New Hanover County deputies said the homeowner woke up around 2:30 a.m. Sunday to the men entering his home.

Investigators say the homeowner and the men started shooting at each other, and one of the suspects was fatally wounded.

Deputies said in a statement that the shooting remains under investigation.

Authorities did not identify the people involved.

Source

House bill would make concealed carry permits valid in any state that issues them

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday allowing concealed carry gun permits to be valid in any state that issues permits.

There are 10 states that do not recognize out-of-state concealed carry permits. Most of those states have a higher level of requirements for the issue of permits. Permit holders in California, for example, must demonstrate a specific need for a concealed carry permit for local law enforcement officials.

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act cleared the House with a 231-198 vote, including a vote in favor cast by Montana’s lone congressman, Rep. Greg Gianforte, who is also one of the bill’s 213 co-sponsors.

Montana requires concealed carry permit holders to have some type of firearms training such as a hunter’s safety course and undergo a background check performed by county sheriff’s offices. Permits from 43 states are recognized in Montana, including all 10 states that do not recognize any out-of-state permits. Vermont does not issue concealed carry permits.

According to the Montana Office of the Attorney General’s website, several states — Delaware, Maine, New Hampshire, Hawaii, Rhode Island and the District of Columbia — do not require background checks for concealed carry permit applicants. Those permits are not recognized in Montana.

Montana’s concealed carry permits are not recognized by eight states in addition to the 10 that do not accept out-of-state concealed carry permits.

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National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act advancing slowly

Are you a gun owner?  Are you a gun owner with a concealed carry permit?  If you answered “yes” to either of these questions, the odds are you’ve been keeping your eye on the slow, steady, advancement of the National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act.

The Bill, which is currently inching its way out of Committee and onto the House floor, would mean that the rights of a concealed weapons permit holder in one state would be recognized in other states that allow similar licenses.  It would make movement, and self-defense, less complicated for interstate travelers who are already qualified to carry on their home turf.

It also just makes sense. After all, if you have a concealed carry license in one state, you’ve obviously passed a federal background check.  You shouldn’t be penalized thanks to the labyrinthine firearms laws that come into play when moving about the country.

The official Congress.gov summary reads as follows:

This bill amends the federal criminal code to allow a qualified individual to carry a concealed handgun into or possess a concealed handgun in another state that allows individuals to carry concealed firearms.

A qualified individual must: (1) be eligible to possess, transport, or receive a firearm under federal law; (2) carry a valid photo identification document; and (3) carry a valid concealed carry permit issued by, or be eligible to carry a concealed firearm in, his or her state of residence.

Additionally, the bill specifies that a qualified individual who lawfully carries or possesses a concealed handgun in another state: (1) is not subject to the federal prohibition on possessing a firearm in a school zone, and (2) may carry or possess the concealed handgun in federally owned lands that are open to the public.

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