1 suspect killed, 1 charged in Hattiesburg home invasion

One man was killed and another arrested Sunday night during a home invasion in Hattiesburg.

Hattiesburg police responded to the home invasion around 9:30 p.m. Sunday in the 100 block of Orange Street.

The homeowners said two men rushed into their home, displayed a hand gun and demanded money, Hattiesburg police spokeswoman Lt. LaTosha Myers-Mitchell said.

One of the suspects, Justin Woodland, 17, of Hattiesburg was shot by the homeowner. He was transported to Forrest General Hospital, where he later was pronounced dead.

The second suspect, Anton Smith, 29, of Hattiesburg was charged with burglary of a dwelling, armed robbery and leaving the scene an accident. He was booked into Forrest County Jail.

No charges have been filed against the homeowner, but the investigation into the incident is ongoing.

Anyone who may have information about the incident is asked to call Hattiesburg police at (601) 544-7900 or Metro Crime Stoppers at (601) 582-7867.

Source

Tennessee Hero Uses His Gun To Stop A Deadly Church Shooter

A man in a mask opened fire at a church in Antioch, Tennessee on Sunday morning, injuring seven people and killing a woman who was walking to her car. Police say the gunman, whom they suspect is 25-year-old Emanuel Kidega Samson, entered Burnette Chapel Church of Christ and “began indiscriminately shooting” people inside the main sanctuary. Luckily, a brave church usher stopped the gunman in his tracks.

When 22-year-old Caleb Engle first confronted the gunman, the shooter pistol-whipped him, authorities say. During this initial struggle, the suspect shot himself in the chest, giving Engle — a licensed gun owner — time to get his gun from his car. Police say Engle used his gun to make sure the suspect didn’t try to make a move before help arrived.

“He’s the hero,” said Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson, according to NBC News. “He’s the person who stopped this madness.”

Engle says police are the ones who deserve the credit for saving the day.

“The real heroes are the police, first responders and medical staff and doctors who have helped me and everyone affected,” Engle said.

Samson, who is believed to have come to the United States from Sudan in 1996, has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder. He is being held without bond and police say he will be charged with additional crimes. Churchgoers said Samson used to attend Burnette Chapel Church of Christ more than a year ago, but officials are still piecing together what motivated the suspect to carry out this deadly rampage.

Read More

Springfield releases new .40-caliber 1911 EMP pistol

Springfield Armory released Monday the next logical caliber for the 1911 EMP concealed carry contour model, a new variant chambered in .40 S&W.

While it’s the same design, the Illinois-based gun maker modified the gun’s construction for the larger cartridge by replacing the aluminum alloy frame with a carbon steel that’s finished in Black-T and a rounded off heel and mainspring housing.

Springfield touts that what makes the EMP design popular is its “concealed carry contour design,” as the gun has a slim single-stack design and reduced dimensions of the grip frame. Engineers compressed the 1911 platform, which was originally designed for .45, and designed it around the 9mm cartridge. This process meant altering every mechanism of the action.

The new Springfield EMP design maintains many of the same features as its former like the contoured grip that removes part of the grip that tends to print. A satin finish 416 stainless steel slide has rear cocking serrations and a 3-dot sight system which employs a red fiber optic in front and a low profile white dot sight in back. The 4-inch stainless steel, match-grade bushing-less bull barrel incorporates a fully supported ramp.

Also, the frame’s frontstraps and main spring housing are both treated with an aggressive Posi-Lock golf ball dimple texturing. Coupled with thin-line G10 panels featuring the same texture provides a grip designed to provide maximum comfort and control. An ambidextrous thumb safety makes it southpaw friendly too.

Unloaded, the new EMP pistol weighs 33 ounces, measures 5-inches in height and 6.6 inches in length, it comes with three eight-round magazines, and retails for $1,249.

Source

SHARE Act Critical To Hunters And Shooters

U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-S.C., has introduced a new measure designed to reduce burdensome regulations on America’s sportsmen, enhance access to public lands and simplify the purchasing process for firearm suppressors.

Called the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act, H.R. 3668 is being touted as “critical” by the National Rifle Association.

“The SHARE Act is critical legislation that will protect America’s hunters and recreational shooters and help preserve our outdoor heritage,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action. “This bill contains many important reforms to federal law that will remove unnecessary restrictions on our Second Amendment freedoms and hunting heritage.”

Several different versions of the SHARE Act have been considered in Congress over the past several years, and the legislation has passed the U.S. House of Representatives during each of the last three sessions of Congress, according to a report at nraila.org. Few, however, expected that then-President Barack Obama would have signed the bill into law. Fortunately, there’s no such roadblock with President Donald Trump now in the White House.

The measure is a many-faceted bill that addresses a number of important issues. Among other things, it would clarify and strengthen the Firearm Owners’ Protection Act of 1986, which protects the lawful transport of firearms from one location where they are legal to another. These reforms more clearly delineate what behavior is protected and provide remedies for persons whose rights under FOPA are violated.

The bill also contains the Lawful Purpose and Self-Defense Act, aimed at ensuring the Second Amendment’s core purpose of self-defense is adequately considered in the administration of federal firearms law. Currently, several federal laws that regulate the importation, possession and transfer of firearms and ammunition measure their lawful utility based on their usefulness for so-called “sporting purposes,” which can be—and has been—exploited by anti-gun administrations and bureaucrats.

Another important part of the SHARE Act is the Recreational Lands Self-Defense Act. Federal law already recognizes the right of law-abiding Americans to carry firearms for self-defense when camping or hiking on National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System lands by incorporating the firearm carry laws of the states in which the lands are located. This portion of the SHARE Act would extend that same rule to the 11.7 million acres of land administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which includes 400 lakes and river projects, 90,000 campsites, and 4,000 miles of trails.

Finally, the SHARE Act includes the Hearing Protection Act (HPA), which would eliminate burdensome and expensive regulations on suppressors. The HPA would remove firearm sound suppressors from regulation under the National Firearms Act, eliminating the $200 transfer tax on these items and decreasing the red tape and long processing times currently associated with their purchase.

“On behalf of America’s gun owners and sportsmen, I would like to thank Rep. Duncan for introducing this important legislation,” Cox added. “All Americans deserve access to our rich outdoor heritage and the tools that help making hunting and shooting safer.”

Source

Authorities identify suspected intruder who was fatally shot during apparent home invasion

DOWNEY — Authorities have identified the suspected intruder who was killed by a homeowner during an apparent home invasion early Friday morning in this southern Bannock County town.

Joseph Lloyd, 34, of Pocatello, was fatally shot by the homeowner around 4 a.m. Friday while forcing his way through the door of the residence on Barnes Lane off Highway 40 just west of Downey city limits, according to the Bannock County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities said no charges are pending against the man who killed Lloyd because all indications are that the man opened fire in defense of himself and other family members who were at home at the time.

Lloyd was struck by the gunfire and died at the scene — prior to the arrival of responding sheriff’s deputies.

The Sheriff’s Office said an autopsy is being performed on Lloyd to determine how many times he was shot.

Authorities said based on their findings thus far in the investigation all indications are that Lloyd was invading the home when he was killed.

The Sheriff’s Office is not yet commenting on what type of gun was used to kill Lloyd or whether Lloyd was armed as well.

Lloyd has a criminal record and was released from the Bannock County Jail about two weeks ago after being arrested on a felony drug charge, authorities said.

The name of the man who killed Lloyd is not going to be released, the Sheriff’s Office said.

The Sheriff’s Office does want to make it clear that it appears Lloyd was acting alone and “there is no evidence indicating any further threat” to public safety as a result of the apparent home invasion.

Source

Taco Bell Workers Kill Armed Robber During Failed Robbery Operation

Three employees from a Taco Bell store in Cleveland reportedly shot and killed an armed robber when he and a partner tried to rob the store on Wednesday, Sept. 6.

Reports claimed that the three male workers from the fast food chain whose names were unrevealed were also armed when the two masked robbers entered the restaurant at 2:45 a.m. on Wednesday to get cash from the register.

The Taco Bell employees were reported to have opened fire and shot one of the robbers in the ribs while the other one managed to escape.

The local police officers arrived at the restaurant after the incident, where they discovered the attempted robber lying unconscious on the ground while holding a loaded gun in his hand. According to reports, the suspected robber has received a total of six shots. He was later on pronounced dead when he was brought to the MetroHealth Medical Center.

The medical examiner reportedly identified the suspected robber as a 24-year-old Cleveland resident named DeCarlo Jackson.

Read More

Tested: Carolina Arms Group Trenton Tactical

The M1911 pistol market continues to expand at a rate that defies easy explanation. Today, an example of this classic firearm can be purchased from almost every major handgun manufacturer. And while entry-level .45s still exist, most M1911s today come with a variety of cosmetic or functional upgrades, and the biggest trend is for firms to build high-end versions, right from scratch.

One company that is fairly new to the market—and that is the maker of the gun reviewed here—is Carolina Arms Group. This North Carolina-based firm is heavily staffed with veterans, and has a declared dedication to producing the best possible versions of the classic M1911-pattern handgun. Its first product, the Trenton pistol, is named for the reliability-under-stress character displayed by the ragged soldiers of George Washington’s Continental Army in the Battle of Trenton, N.J., on Dec. 26, 1776.

For this report, it provided a sample Trenton Tactical chambered in .45 ACP. The gun is made from forged carbon steel finished in a flat, tactical black color. Contours are of the familiar M1911A1 pattern, with manual and grip safeties, a Commander-style hammer and a left-side magazine release. A departure from the norm is the full-length recoil spring guide. Carolina Arms manufactures most of its own small parts in house.

The pistol’s beavertail grip safety has been hand-fitted to the frame (l.). The Trenton Tactical pairs a black, wide-notch, combat-style Dawson Precision rear sight with a red fiber-optic front sight, both of which are drift-adjustable (r.).

From a distance, the Trenton has the typical M1911 look and could be confused with other makers’ products. But its high levels of fit and internal finish are readily apparent when cycling the slide and dry firing the gun. There is little play in the fit of the slide to the frame—only enough to ensure they function properly together. That movement is very smooth, as is the shorter travel of the overtravel-adjustable trigger in its slot. The trigger break was crisp after the typical amount of slack, and measured right at the manufacturer’s stated 4-lb. specification. Like most modern guns of this pattern, the Trenton has a beavertail grip safety, and, in this case, it appears to have been perfectly fitted to the receiver. The Trenton’s thumb safety is bilateral, while the hammer is a skeletonized version of the round Commander style. There are angled cocking serrations at the rear of the slide.

Several useful shooter amenities have been worked into the Trenton design. Crafted from G10 laminate, the gray-black stocks by VZ Grips feature a coarse pattern of vertical channels accented with lateral grooves. This aggressive pattern is abrasive, but works well for shooters who need some extra texturing to help them hold on to the gun while firing. A further positive grip comes from an attractive but functional treatment applied to the frontstrap and mainspring housing. Instead of checkering or vertical grooving, these surfaces bear a series of overlapping oval-shaped depressions that work well to enhance purchase.

The Trenton’s designers may have wanted to build a very traditional gun, but they also included several modern enhancements for practical use. The front sight is a red-fiber-optic unit, as used on a number of other modern guns, which is matched with a Dawson Precision rear sight with a black sighting surface and a wide notch. It is an arrangement well-suited to a variety of shooting situations. The Carolina Arms Group marks its new pistol with a stylized eagle head and wing, contoured into a letter “C.” Logos appear on both sides of the slide and both stocks; the slide also reads “Carolina Arms Group” on the left and “Trenton” on the right.

One additional feature needs to be mentioned. The maker’s pistols all feature barrels manufactured by Kart, which are designed for installation by professional gunsmiths. Kart-made barrels have earned a reputation for exceptional accuracy.

Read More

Marine Corps selects Safran Optics’ gun-mounted rangefinder

Safran Optics 1 Inc. announced Friday that the U.S. Marine Corps will be buying its Integrated Compact Ultralight Gun-mounted Rangefinder for its snipers.

The I-CUGR is a small, lightweight, and rugged weapon-mounted laser rangefinder with integrated illumination and aiming lasers that will give the Marine Corps the ability to quickly range targets without taking hands off their rifles — providing more accurate first round hits, the company said in a release.

“We appreciate the opportunity to continue working closely with the U.S. Marine Corps in providing the Marines with superior technology that provides precise and accurate targeting solutions,” said Jose Andrade, Optics 1 business development manager and a retired Marine Corps sergeant major. “The selection of the I-CUGR solidifies the confidence in our commitment to providing technologies that are light yet powerful and are critical to the success of the USMC’s mission requirements.”

The I-CUGR was designed by Optics 1 leveraging rangefinder technology from Safran Electronics & Defense. Production will take place in Bedford at Optics 1. The initial order is for 315 units with deliveries beginning this year.

Safran Optics employs about 80 people at its Bedford location and nearly 100 companywide. Production takes place inside of a three-story, 51,572-square-foot building housed at 2 Cooper Lane.

Originally known as Optics 1 , the company was founded by Robert Fischer, a California-based optical engineer, designer and former chief scientist for Hughes Aircraft. The Safran Group acquired Optics 1 through Vectronix in 2009 to pursue more opportunities in the U.S. market. Last year, Vectronix Inc. merged with Optics 1 Inc., its U.S.-based research and development subsidiary, and now the company is known as Safran Optics 1, a wholly owned subsidiary of Vectronix AG and a part of Safran Electronics & Defense, a Safran group company.

Source

 

79-year-old thwarts would-be robber with concealed firearm

 Police say that a 79-year-old Stanton man thwarted a would-be robber after pulling out his concealed firearm.

Andrew Yanez, 24, has been charged and arrested for Attempted Robbery and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

According to the Stanton Police Department, the elderly man was leaving a convenience store Friday afternoon when he was approached by a suspect.

The suspect then demanded keys to his vehicle, stating “It would be best for you to give me the keys, I want your car” and implied violence would be used, according to police.

It was then that the victim who was licensed to carry a handgun drew his concealed firearm and pointed it towards the suspect, who fled the scene on foot.

A description of the suspect was provided to police, and he was located two blocks away from the scene and was identified as Yanez.

According to police, Yanez was found to have a semi-automatic handgun in his possession. He was then arrested and booked into the Martin County Jail.

Source