Silencer debate the latest gun battle

WASHINGTON — What the average person knows about silencers likely comes from James Bond and the “Bourne’’ movies —stealthy assassins holding up cylinder-tipped pistols and shooting their victims with nary a sound.

The National Firearms Act of 1934 subjected silencers to heavy and (at the time) unaffordable regulation, in an effort to deprive Al Capone-era gangsters of a favored murder accessory.

But as part of a legislative strategy switch from defense to offense, groups such as the Newtown-based National Shooting Sports Foundation are including a rollback of silencer regulations on its wish list in the era of gun-friendly GOP control of Congress and the White House.

Also included is the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, which would enable anyone legally carrying firearms in gun-rights states such as Texas and Florida to get protection of those loose laws even when during travel to gun-unfriendly jurisdictions such as Connecticut.

The concealed-carry reciprocity measure is a perennial that never got through Congress in previous years, and surely would’ve earned a Barack Obama veto if it had.

All states, including Connecticut, permit concealed carry in some form, although Connecticut makes it much more difficult to obtain a permit than, say, the Southern states.

“These proposals will put all our communities at risk,’’ said Rep. Elizabeth Esty, D-Conn., a leading gun-violence-prevention advocate among Democrats in the House.

Hearing Protection Act

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